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ReliefWeb - Training
    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 23 Jan 2019
    Starting date: 23 Jan 2019
    Ending date: 01 Feb 2019

    This course focuses on the functioning and the mechanisms of the United Nations (UN) Human Rights Council, as well as on the dynamics at play in this major human rights body.

    An interactive way of teaching empowers participants – both those who already know the HRC from inside and those who are not familiar with this multilateral world of negotiations and politics – to better understand the HRC.

    Skills for Personal Effectiveness

    Preparing for intense and high-level engagement during the HRC requires a deep understanding of its rules, functioning and practice. The ability to negotiate, advocate, lobby and push for issues in such a complex environment also requires a sound knowledge of the different actors and dynamics at play, as well as strong communication skills.

    This course, ahead of the main HRC session, allows participants to develop their network and acquire the necessary skills to lead and perform effectively in this major forum for human rights diplomacy. It also allows them to grasp the main issues and challenges at stake.

    Programme

    The programme follows a strong logic of sequence and ends up with a huge Q&A session, led by a special guest. It is structured around four main themes:

    1. The Functioning of the HRC

    • The functioning, rules and practice of HRC
    • The various HRC mechanisms (e.g. special sessions, commissions of inquiry, special procedures, universal periodical review)
    • The dynamics at play
    • The role and influence of individuals
    • The role, functions and influence of other actors: who does what? How does this play out in concrete terms?
    • The role of ‘satellite’ factors, such as unexpected political situations or external pressures

    2. The Phenomenon of Working within and Across ‘Groupings’

    • HRC regional groups and their dynamics
    • Coalitions
    • Serving in one or more groupings
    • Tensions between bilateral/multilateral policies and HRC diplomacy, and the challenges of ensuring cohesion between these
    • Best practices and tools for juggling a complex agenda

    3. Leadership in the HRC

    • Who leads what and when?
    • Is there a place for a personal leadership or group dynamics takes it all?
    • What role states, NGOs and representatives of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights play?

    4. The HRC Positioning in the Overall UN Architecture

    • What position does the HRC occupy in the organigram of UN political bodies such as the General Assembly and Security Council?
    • What are the pros and cons of this position?

    Optional pre-session reading materials, including links to key Geneva Academy's events on the HRC, are made available two weeks prior to the training, for background, context and introduction of key concepts.

    Benefits

    This course allows participants to acquire:

    • A deeper understanding of the functioning, rules and practice of the HRC
    • Key leadership skills in human rights negotiations, advocacy and lobbying
    • First-hand insights into HRC dynamics, in an informal and non-partisan environment
    • Enhanced knowledge of the various actors intervening in the HRC and its different mechanisms (e.g. special sessions, commissions of inquiry, special procedures, universal periodical review)

    Lecturers

    Lecturers include Geneva Academy experts, renowned academic scholars, as well as senior professionals from international organizations, NGOs and governments.

    Methodology

    The course is composed of interactive lessons, using case studies of real situations in the HRC from the last three sessions. These help participants to acquire the required knowledge, take part in discussion forums and engage with practical examples and case studies. The various sessions are designed to address cross-cutting issues and build participant skills through simulation exercises, small group breakouts and role-playing.

    Throughout the course, participants interact with their peers, key HRC actors, as well as academics and experienced practitioners.

    Audience

    This short course forms part of the Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is designed for professionals who already have some experience with the HRC: diplomats and experts from diplomatic missions and foreign ministries; staff from international and regional organizations working in the field of human rights; employees of governmental and non-governmental organizations, journalists or representatives of National Human Rights Institutions.

    Schedule

    • Wednesday 23 January 2019, 15:30-21:00
    • Thursday 24 January 2019, 13:15-15:15
    • Friday 25 January 2019, 13:15-15:15
    • Wednesday 30 January 2019, 15:30-17:30
    • Thursday 31 January 2019, 15:30-17:30
    • Friday 1 February 2019, 13:15-15:15

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained) during a certifying small ceremony at the end. A minimum of 80 percent of presence is required to obtain the certificate.

    Accommodation

    Participants can request on-campus accommodation via the online application form. Due to the limited places available, accommodation is not guaranteed. Participants seeking on-campus accommodation are encouraged to request it as soon as possible.


    How to register:

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, external participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 18 Jan 2019
    Starting date: 25 Jan 2019
    Ending date: 22 Feb 2019

    This course focuses on the specific issues that arise in times of armed conflict regarding the respect, protection and fulfilment of human rights. It addresses key issues like the applicability of human rights in times of armed conflict; the possibilities of restricting human rights under systems of limitations and derogations; and the extraterritorial application of human rights law. Throughout the course, the interplay between international humanitarian law and human rights law is systematically tackled by analysing their different origins, fields of application and monitoring bodies, as well as different theories conceptualizing their relationship. These issues are further illustrated by discussing two particularly emblematic human rights in times of armed conflict, namely the right to life and the prohibition of arbitrary deprivation of liberty.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations –who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Friday 25 January 2019 18:15 – 20:45
    • Friday 1st February 2019 18:15 – 20:45
    • Friday 8 February 2019 18:15 – 20:45
    • Friday 15 February 2019 18:15 – 20:45
    • Friday 22 February 2019 18:15 – 20:45

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • An application letter, stating the specific course you are applying for and your motivation for participation
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 18 Jan 2019
    Starting date: 25 Jan 2019
    Ending date: 22 Feb 2019

    What role do sanctions play in international law? What are the conditions for implementing sanctions against a state? Who decides? Are sanctions a useful tool for avoiding or stopping armed conflicts? This course provides an introduction to the regime of sanctions under international law and their effectiveness in addressing contemporary forms of conflict. It addresses the questions related to state responsibility, the pacific settlement of international disputes and the role of the International Court of Justice.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Friday 25 January 2019 15:30 – 18:00
    • Friday 1st February 2019 15:30 – 18:00
    • Friday 8 February 2019 15:30 – 18:00
    • Friday 15 February 2019 15:30 – 18:00
    • Friday 22 February 2019 15:30 – 18:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 29 Mar 2019
    Starting date: 08 Mar 2019
    Ending date: 05 Apr 2019

    Who is a refugee? What is the legal framework currently applicable to those fleeing states affected by armed conflicts like Syria, Iraq or Afghanistan? What are the related obligations of European states? This course analyses the main international and regional legal norms governing refugee protection. It examines the sources of international refugee law, including the 1951 Geneva Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, and their interaction with human rights law and international humanitarian law. It also analyzes the definition of a refugee under both the 1951 Geneva Convention and the Common European Asylum System, the principle of non-refoulement as well as asylum procedures. Particular attention is dedicated to the case law of State Parties to the 1951 Geneva Convention.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Friday 8 March 2019 15:30 – 18:00
    • Friday 15 March 2019 15:30 – 18:00
    • Friday 22 March 2019 15:30 – 18:00
    • Friday 29 March 2019 15:30 – 18:00
    • Friday 5 April 2019 15:30 – 18:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 31 Jan 2019
    Starting date: 07 Feb 2019
    Ending date: 14 Mar 2019

    Since the 9.11 attacks, and with the multiplication of terrorist attacks on European soil, terrorism is considered one of the most important security threats the international community has to face. To what extent may states limit and/or derogate from their international human rights obligations in order to prevent and counter terrorism and thus protect persons under their jurisdiction? Which and whose human rights are at risk when states fight terrorism? What are the human rights challenges posed by the United Nations counter-terrorist sanctions regime? In which circumstances may lethal force – including drone strikes – be used against alleged members of terrorist groups or so-called ‘lone wolves’? Which international law rules apply in relation to the internment/detention and interrogation of persons accused of terrorism?

    These are some of the key issues discussed in this course, addressing several rights including the right to life, the right to liberty, the prohibition of torture, the right to property, and freedom of movement. Although the course is mainly human rights oriented, other international legal frameworks such as jus ad bellum and international humanitarian law will be touched upon. Recent trends in counter-terrorism, such as the preventing and countering violent extremism agenda, will be discussed in light of their human rights impact.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Thursday 7 February 2019, 18:00 – 20:30
    • Thursday 14 February 2019, 18:00 – 20:30
    • Thursday 21 February 2019, 18:00 – 20:30
    • Thursday 28 February 2019, 18:00 – 20:30
    • Thursday 7 March 2019, 18:00 – 20:30

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 07 Mar 2019
    Starting date: 15 Mar 2019
    Ending date: 29 Mar 2019

    While international humanitarian law (IHL) was initially drafted and is still most detailed for international armed conflicts (IACs), most armed conflicts are today of a non-international character (NIACs).

    This course discusses the protection offered by IHL in NIACs and examines why and to what extent IHL of IACs and IHL of NIACs are different or similar, as well as where the rules applicable to NIACs can be found. It also addresses some problems and controversies specific to IHL of NIACs, including the difficulty to ensure the respect of IHL by armed non-state actors.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Friday 15 March 2019, 18:15 – 20:45
    • Thursday 21 March 2019, 18:00 – 20:30
    • Friday 22 March 2019, 18:15 – 20:45
    • Thursday 28 March 2019, 18:00 – 20:30
    • Friday 29 March 2019, 18:15 – 20:45

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course


    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 28 Mar 2019
    Starting date: 04 Apr 2019
    Ending date: 19 Apr 2019

    International criminal justice has been facing many challenges over the course of its history. From the creation of necessary norms and institutions to enforce it to political resistance to making itself relevant, it has faced a range problems and difficulties, not all of them are behind it. The course will focus on five particular categories of challenges: legal or normative, investigative and evidential, political, the defence, and the legacy.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.
    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Thursday 4 April 2019 18:00 – 20:30
    • Thursday 11 April 2019 18:00 – 20:30
    • Friday 12 April 2019 15:30 – 18:00
    • Thursday 18 April 2019 18:00 – 20:30
    • Friday 19 April 2019 15:30 – 18:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.
    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 01 Mar 2019
    Starting date: 01 Sep 2019
    Ending date: 01 Aug 2020

    Our LLM (60 ECTS) is one of the most innovative and intellectually challenging programmes in international humanitarian law (IHL) and human rights offered in Europe today. It is structured around the following seven components.

    Core Courses

    Core courses are mandatory and provide a solid legal basis and understanding of public international law, IHL, international human rights law, international refugee law and international criminal law.

    Optional Courses

    Optional courses allow our students to deepen their expertise in a particular issue such as armed non state actors in international law, the conduct of hostilities, enforced disappearances or the Islamiclaw of armed conflict. Places in the optional courses are limited to 20 in order to guarantee the quality of exchanges and discussions.

    Internships

    Our LLM students have the opportunity, during Spring Semester, to acquire first-hand professional experience via internships with Geneva-based humanitarian and human rights actors.

    Moot Courts

    As part of the curriculum, our LLM students can participate in three moot courts– the prestigious Jean-Pictet Competition on IHL, the Nuremberg Moot Court and the Nelson Mandela World Human Rights Moot Court Competition – as well as in public pleadings on specific conflict situations.

    Military Briefings

    This unique series of events relating to military institutions and the law aims to improve our students’ knowledge of military actors and operations, and build bridges between the military and civilian worlds.

    LLM Paper

    Our LLM promotes academic excellence and independent critical thinking. One of its core outputs is an LLM paper on a specific issue addressed by the programme and written under the guidance of a faculty member.

    Study Trip

    In Spring Semester, LLM students go on a study trip to learn about leading institutions and organizations active in the field of IHL and human rights.


    How to register:

    You can apply for the LLM in International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights via a straightforward, online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Please read the information in this section carefully before starting an application, as it will help ensure a quick and smooth application process.

    Two Application Tracks

    There are two tracks through which you can apply:

    Please note that you must choose one track or the other. If you apply through both, your application will be considered under the non-scholarship track. Successful applicants who applied without requesting a scholarship cannot subsequently be considered for a scholarship.

    Four Simple Steps

    The online application is divided into the following four steps:

    1. Decide whether to apply (1) without scholarship, (2) with full scholarship; (3) with partial scholarship
    2. Complete the application form
    3. Attach the required documents
    4. Submit your application

    Retrieving your Information

    If you do not complete your application form in one go you have the following two options:

    1. A cookie will allow you to retrieve all the information you have provided, only if (1) you work from the same computer; (2) you haven’t refused the use of cookies when accessing the Geneva Academy website for the first time; (3) you haven’t refused cookies by adjusting the settings of your web browser.
    2. You can copy and paste or bookmark the URL found at the bottom of the online application form. When you paste this URL into your web browser you will retrieve all the information you have entered on the form, even if you are working from a different computer.

    Confidentiality

    The information you provide in the application form will be treated in the strictest confidence and will only be used by the Admissions Committee and scholarship donors.

    Required Documents

    All the documents required (PDF format) are specified in the online application form and have to be attached to your online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

    Please do not send original documents, as all submitted materials become the property of the Geneva Academy upon receipt. Documents cannot be returned to the applicant nor forwarded to other schools or agencies. You will however need to bring your original diplomas and transcripts to Geneva if you submit non-certified copies with your application.

    The documents you have to provide with your application are:

    • Your curriculum vitae in English

    • A personal statement in English explaining your interest in the programme (no longer than two pages)

    • Two letters of recommendation in English – no specific format is required

    • Certified copies of relevant degrees and diplomas (with an officially certified translation when not in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish) – if copies are not certified, you will need to present the original documents upon your arrival in Geneva

    • Certified copies of official records of university examinations taken and grades obtained (with an officially certified translation when not in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish) – if copies are not certified, you will need to present the original documents upon your arrival in Geneva

    • If you are currently enrolled in a university programme, an attestation by the relevant university of your current enrollment with an official record of the latest university examinations taken and grades obtained

    • Language tests– TOEF IELTS, DALF – or verification of language skills (the Geneva Academy does not have an attributed code; please do not use the University of Geneva code, nor the Graduate Institute code)

    • A copy of your passport

    If you apply for a scholarship (partial or full), you will also have to provide the following documents:

    • Proof of your current income (e.g. salary statement, bank statement, tax declaration, employer’s letter) – if such proof is not available, please explain why

    • Proof of your family’s financial situation (e.g. salary statement, bank statement) – if such proof is not available, please explain why

    • Proof, if applicable, of any financial support you currently receive (e.g. letter from parents, sponsors, scholarship donor)

    Checklist

    Use this checklist to make sure you have all the requested documents ready before starting your application.


    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 01 Mar 2019
    Starting date: 01 Sep 2019
    Ending date: 01 Aug 2020

    Our Master of Advanced Studies in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law (MTJ) is one of the very few courses on this subject worldwide. It is structured around the following five components.

    CORE COURSES

    Core courses are mandatory and are spread over the two semesters. They are structured in six modules that cover central theoretical and practical issues in the fields of transitional justice, human rights and the rule of law.

    SPRING TERM TRACKS

    During the Spring Semester, three different tracks – Thematic Focus, Clinical Work or Academic Research– allow students to tailor their studies according to their particular interests. Allocation of places in the different tracks is based on a competitive selection process.

    SPRING SCHOOL

    The Transitional Justice Spring School, a special one-week course, discusses cutting-edge issues in transitional justice. It is held in Spring Semester and is also open to external participants.

    MASTER’S PAPER

    The master’s paper gives students an opportunity to investigate a subject of special interest to them, deepening their knowledge and expertise through research as well as exchanges with experts, scholars and practitioners.

    STUDY TRIP

    In the second semester students have the opportunity to go on a study trip to familiarize with the history of transitional justice.


    How to register:

    You can apply for the Master of Advanced Studies in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law (MTJ) via a straightforward, online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Please read the information in this section carefully before starting an application, as it will help ensure a quick and smooth application process.

    Two Application Tracks

    There are two tracks through which you can apply:

    Please note that you must choose one track or the other. If you apply through both, your application will be considered under the non-scholarship track. Successful applicants who applied without requesting a scholarship cannot subsequently be considered for a scholarship.

    Four Simple Steps

    The online application is divided into the following four steps:

    1. Decide whether apply (1) without scholarship, (2) with full scholarship or (3) with partial scholarship
    2. Complete the application form
    3. Attach the required documents
    4. Submit your application

    Retrieving your Information

    If you do not complete your application form in one go you have the following two options:

    1. A cookie will allow you to retrieve all the information you have provided, only if (1) you work from the same computer; (2) you haven’t refused the use of cookies when accessing the Geneva Academy website for the first time; (3) you haven’t refused cookies by adjusting the settings of your web browser.
    2. You can copy and paste or bookmark the URL found at the bottom of the online application form. When you paste this URL into your web browser you will retrieve all the information you have entered on the form, even if you are working from a different computer.

    Confidentiality

    The information you provide in the application form will be treated in the strictest confidence and will only be used by the Admissions Committee and scholarship donors.

    Required Documents

    All the documents required are specified in the online application form and have to be attached to your online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

    Please do not send original documents, as all submitted materials become the property of the Geneva Academy upon receipt. Documents cannot be returned to the applicant nor forwarded to other schools or agencies.

    You will need to bring your original diplomas and transcripts to Geneva if you submit non-certified copies with your application.

    The documents you have to provide with your application are:

    • Your curriculum vitae
    • A personal statement explaining your interest in the programme (1–3 pages)
    • Two letters of recommendation– no specific format is required
    • Certified copiesof relevant degrees and diplomas (with an officially certified translation when not in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish) – if copies are not certified, you will need to present the original documents upon your arrival in Geneva
    • Certified copies of official records of university examinations taken and grades obtained (with an officially certified translation when not in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish) – if copies are not certified, you will need to present the original documents upon your arrival in Geneva
    • If you are currently enrolled in a university programme, an attestation by the relevant university of your current enrollment with an official record of the latest university examinations taken and grades obtained
    • Language tests– TOEF IELTS, DALF – or verification of language skills (the Geneva Academy does not have an attributed code; please do not use the University of Geneva code, nor the Graduate Institute code)
    • A copy of your passport

    If you apply for a scholarship (partial or full), you will also have to provide the following documents:

    • Proof of your current income (e.g. salary statement, bank statement, tax declaration, employer’s letter) – if such proof is not available, please explain why
    • Proof of your family’s financial situation (e.g. salary statement, bank statement) – if such proof is not available, please explain why
    • Proof, if applicable, of any financial support you currently receive (e.g. letter from parents, sponsors, scholarship donor)

    Checklist

    Use this checklist to make sure you have all the requested documents ready before starting your application.


    0 0

    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Country: Switzerland
    Registration deadline: 04 Mar 2019
    Starting date: 04 Mar 2019
    Ending date: 23 Sep 2019

    The programme is structured around four modules that provide a solid theoretical and practical knowledge of the law that applies to armed conflicts. Modules are complemented by a five-day intensive extracurricular seminar, Leading in the Human Rights Council, and the writing of a master’s thesis.

    Module 1: Public International Law

    This module comprises courses on the sources and subjects of public international law, sanctions in public international law, and the rules that govern the use of force in international law and the ‘Responsibility to Protect’.

    Module 2: International Humanitarian Law

    This module comprises courses on the basic principles of international humanitarian law (IHL), the protection of persons and property in international armed conflict, the classification of armed conflicts and the law of non-international armed conflicts.

    Module 3: International Human Rights Law

    This module comprises courses on international refugee law, the interplay between IHL and human rights and peacebuilding in post-conflict situations.

    Module 4: International Criminal Law

    This module comprises courses on international criminal law and the International Criminal Court and tribunals.

    Extracurricular Course: Optimizing the Human Rights Council

    This extracurricular course, ahead of the main session of the Human Rights Council, allows participants to develop their network and acquire the necessary skills to lead and perform effectively in this major forum for human rights diplomacy.

    Master’s Thesis

    One of the core outputs of the Executive Master is a master’s thesis written under the guidance of a faculty member. Participants are not required to remain on campus or in Geneva to write their thesis.


    How to register:

    A straightforward Online Application

    You can apply for the Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict via a straightforward, online form.
    If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Please read the information in this section carefully before starting an application, as it will help ensure a quick and smooth application process.

    Three Simple Steps

    The online application is divided into the following three steps:

    1. Complete the application form
    2. Attach the required documents
    3. Submit your application

    Retrieving your Information

    If you do not complete your application form in one go you have the following two options:

    1. A cookie will allow you to retrieve all the information you have provided, only if (1) you work from the same computer; (2) you haven’t refused the use of cookies when accessing the Geneva Academy website for the first time; (3) you haven’t refused cookies by adjusting the settings of your web browser.
    2. You can copy and paste or bookmark the URL found at the bottom of the online application form. When you paste this URL into your web browser you will retrieve all the information you have entered on the form, even if you are working from a different computer.

    Confidentiality

    The information you provide in the application form will be treated in the strictest confidence and will only be used by the Admissions Committee.

    Required documents

    All the documents required are specified in the online application form and have to be attached to your online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

    The documents you have to provide with your application are:

    • An application letter in English (no longer than two pages)
    • Your curriculum vitae in English
    • Proof of competence in English
    • A copy of your passeport
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only candidates who need a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Please do not send original documents, as all submitted materials become the property of the Geneva Academy upon receipt. Documents cannot be returned to the applicant nor forwarded to other schools or agencies.


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    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Country: Switzerland
    Registration deadline: 03 Jan 2019
    Starting date: 10 Jan 2019
    Ending date: 24 Jan 2019

    This short course will provide participants with a comprehensive introduction to both substantive human rights law as well as the functioning of international mechanisms for the protection of human rights.

    It will start with an introduction to the nature and sources of international human rights law and its place in the international legal system. Afterwards, the course will examine the different institutional mechanisms for the protection of human rights, both at the universal and regional levels, before delving into an analysis of substantive rights. At the end of the course, participants will be in a position to further delve into human rights literature and case law in order to enhance their grasp of the law, as well as understand the major debates and controversies in the field of human rights protection.

    Audience

    This short course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Classes take place on:

    • Thursday 10 January 2019 18:00 – 20:30
    • Friday 11 January 2019, 15:30 – 18:00
    • Thursday 17 January 2019, 18:00 – 20:30
    • Friday 18 January 2019, 15:30 – 18:00
    • Thursday 24 January 2019 18:00 – 20:30

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Country: Switzerland
    Registration deadline: 18 Mar 2019
    Starting date: 02 Apr 2019
    Ending date: 04 Apr 2019

    Truth Commissions are by now an integral part of the transitional justice vocabulary and practice.

    In countries as varied as Peru, South Africa, Timor-Leste, Tunisia, Kenya and Brazil, truth commissions have been set up to investigate the patterns of past human rights violations.

    The 2019 Spring School will provide a comprehensive, multidimensional and practical examination of this transitional justice mechanism, shedding light on both its aims and the practical challenges it has met or is likely to meet.

    In engaging with these issues, the Spring School will address practically relevant questions about why to set up a truth commission and what role such an institution may play in addressing serious individually and collectively suffered wrongdoing. At the same time, the Spring School will directly engage with relevant questions about how to set up a truth commission, when and by whom.

    Structure and Methodology

    With the aim of linking theory with practical perspectives, the 2019 Spring School will combine interactive lectures on truth commissions and the relevant normative frameworks with practical exercises which will allow students to reflect on the aims and processes of truth commissions via an active and sustainable learning experience.

    On the basis of a hypothetical case scenario, students will have to design and formulate the mandate of a ‘moot’ truth commission. Based on group work and with expert support, they will simulate roles in the advisory and drafting processes leading to the establishment of a truth commission.

    Howard Varney, a leading expert on truth commissions and Senior Programme Advisor at the International Centre for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) will be present throughout the entire Spring School, delivering the courses, sharing his field experience, guiding discussions and managing the practical exercise. He will be supported by a team of the Master of Advanced Study in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law (MTJ).

    Objectives

    At the end of the Spring School, students will have gained insight into:

    • The role of truth-seeking in transitional justice processes
    • Normative frameworks and practices relevant to truth commissions
    • Practical challenges faced in the process of establishing truth commissions
    • The contribution of different actors and perspectives in shaping the mandate of a truth commission
    • The importance of creatively adapting theoretical concepts to particular societal contexts
    • The challenges in drafting detailed terms of reference to provide appropriate guidance for the work of a truth commission
    • Group-based processes of argumentation and negotiation leading to some common position on particular aspects relevant to the work of truth commission.

    Audience

    The Transitional Justice Spring School forms part of the MTJ. It is open to external participants – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, UN staff and staff from other international organizations, and academics and students interested in the topic – who are not enrolled in the MTJ and who want to deepen their expertise in functions setting-up, practice and challenges of truth commissions.

    Certification

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the Spring School (no ECTS credits).

    Accommodation

    Participants may request on-campus accommodation when applying. Due to the limited places available, accommodation is not guaranteed. Participants seeking on-campus accommodation are encouraged to request this as soon as possible.


    How to register:

    Applications for the Transitional Justice Spring School must be submitted via this online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area).

    Once admitted to the spring school, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the spring school.


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    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Country: Switzerland
    Registration deadline: 09 Jun 2019
    Starting date: 09 Sep 2019
    Ending date: 13 Sep 2019

    How complementary are economic, social and cultural rights (ESCR) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the United Nations (UN) in 2015? Which mechanisms exist to monitor their implementation? What is the role of UN human rights mechanisms in monitoring ESCR and the SDGs? Which lessons can be learned from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) period?

    This training course explores the relationship between ESCR and SDGs and provides participants with practical tools to include ESCR and the SDGs in their work. Themes covered include the rights to health, food, water, sanitation, housing, education, work, and social security, and the SDGs related to these rights.

    Participants will observe a session of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and have the opportunity to engage with international human rights experts.

    Programme

    The course covers the following issues:

    • Human rights-based approaches to development
    • ESCR and the MDGs: lessons learned for the SDGs
    • The inclusion of human rights in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
    • Focus on specific SDGs and ESCR: the rights to health, education, water and sanitation, food, housing, work, and social security
    • SDGs 1 to 17: towards the full realization of ESCR for all?
    • No one will be left behind: the end of inequality and discrimination?
    • Gender, ESCR and SDGs
    • Collection of disaggregated data and indicators
    • Accountability at the international level: the High-Level Policy Forum on Sustainable Development and beyond
    • National ownership of the implementation and monitoring of ESCR and the SDGs
    • The role of UN human rights mechanisms in monitoring ESCR and the SDGs (Human Rights Council, special procedures, and treaty bodies)
    • Visit the CRC, and discussion with key experts based in Geneva

    Objectives

    At the end of this course, participants will be:

    • Familiar with human rights-based approaches to development
    • Able to identify the main achievements and weaknesses of the MDGs from a human rights perspective
    • Familiar with the content of specific ESCR and related SDGs, in particular, the rights to health, education, water and sanitation, food, housing, work, and social security
    • Able to identify the main differences and similarities between ESCR and the SDGs
    • Aware of the challenges to the full realization of ESCR and the SDGs
    • Knowledgeable about data collection and indicators to monitor ESCR and the SDGs
    • Aware of the role played by UN human rights mechanisms in monitoring ESCR and the SDGs, in particular, the Human Rights Council, special procedures, and treaty bodies
    • Cognizant of the obstacles faced by international and national mechanisms responsible for monitoring ESCR and the SDGs
    • Able to integrate tools for implementing and monitoring ESCR and the SDGs in their work.

    Methodology

    The course is interactive and participants are encouraged to share their own experiences and perspectives on the issues. The training sessions include lectures and discussions with experts, as well as practical examples and case studies. Sessions are designed to enhance knowledge exchange with peers and facilitators.

    Audience

    This training course is designed for staff of NGOs, development and human rights institutions, UN bodies and other international organizations, as well as representatives of governments and members of academia.

    Certification

    Participants who successfully complete the training course receive a certificate of participation from the Geneva Academy.

    Accommodation

    Participants may request an on-campus accommodation when applying. Due to the limited places available, accommodation is not guaranteed. Participants seeking on-campus accommodation are encouraged to request this as soon as possible.


    How to register:

    Applications must be submitted via the online application form.

    If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us: escrtraining[at]geneva-academy.ch


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    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Country: Switzerland
    Registration deadline: 18 Feb 2019
    Starting date: 28 Feb 2019
    Ending date: 11 Apr 2019

    This short course introduces participants to the Islamic law of armed conflict and how it relates to the current conflicts in Muslim contexts. It examines the rules regulating the use of force during both international and non-international armed conflicts under classical Islamic law. Classical Islamic rules providing protection to certain persons and objects and those regulating certain means and methods of warfare are examined in order to find out, first, the impact/challenges surrounding their application in current armed conflict situations and, second, their compatibility with international humanitarian law rules.

    The course also discusses the distinction between the use of legitimate force and terrorism (both domestic and international) under Islamic law. It analyses the development of the classical Islamic public international law framework and its impact on the issues of the Islamic jus ad bellum and the jurisdiction of Islamic law.

    The course starts with identifying and defining the Islamic law key concepts, sources, and schools in order to familiarize the students with such a complex and highly technical legal system and understand the extent of its contemporary application.

    Audience

    This short course forms part of our LLM in International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights (LLM). It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the LLM and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Thursday 28 February 2019, 17:00 – 19:00
    • Thursday 7 March 2019, 17:00 – 19:00
    • Thursday 14 March 2019, 17:00 – 19:00
    • Thursday 21 March 2019, 17:00 – 19:00
    • Thursday 28 March 2019, 17:00 – 19:00
    • Thursday 4 April 2019, 17:00 – 19:00
    • Thursday 11 April 2019, 17:00 – 19:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the co