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ReliefWeb - Training

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    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Country: Switzerland
    Registration deadline: 04 Mar 2019
    Starting date: 04 Mar 2019
    Ending date: 23 Sep 2019

    The programme is structured around four modules that provide a solid theoretical and practical knowledge of the law that applies to armed conflicts. Modules are complemented by a five-day intensive extracurricular seminar, Leading in the Human Rights Council, and the writing of a master’s thesis.

    Module 1: Public International Law

    This module comprises courses on the sources and subjects of public international law, sanctions in public international law, and the rules that govern the use of force in international law and the ‘Responsibility to Protect’.

    Module 2: International Humanitarian Law

    This module comprises courses on the basic principles of international humanitarian law (IHL), the protection of persons and property in international armed conflict, the classification of armed conflicts and the law of non-international armed conflicts.

    Module 3: International Human Rights Law

    This module comprises courses on international refugee law, the interplay between IHL and human rights and peacebuilding in post-conflict situations.

    Module 4: International Criminal Law

    This module comprises courses on international criminal law and the International Criminal Court and tribunals.

    Extracurricular Course: Optimizing the Human Rights Council

    This extracurricular course, ahead of the main session of the Human Rights Council, allows participants to develop their network and acquire the necessary skills to lead and perform effectively in this major forum for human rights diplomacy.

    Master’s Thesis

    One of the core outputs of the Executive Master is a master’s thesis written under the guidance of a faculty member. Participants are not required to remain on campus or in Geneva to write their thesis.


    How to register:

    A straightforward Online Application

    You can apply for the Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict via a straightforward, online form.
    If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Please read the information in this section carefully before starting an application, as it will help ensure a quick and smooth application process.

    Three Simple Steps

    The online application is divided into the following three steps:

    1. Complete the application form
    2. Attach the required documents
    3. Submit your application

    Retrieving your Information

    If you do not complete your application form in one go you have the following two options:

    1. A cookie will allow you to retrieve all the information you have provided, only if (1) you work from the same computer; (2) you haven’t refused the use of cookies when accessing the Geneva Academy website for the first time; (3) you haven’t refused cookies by adjusting the settings of your web browser.
    2. You can copy and paste or bookmark the URL found at the bottom of the online application form. When you paste this URL into your web browser you will retrieve all the information you have entered on the form, even if you are working from a different computer.

    Confidentiality

    The information you provide in the application form will be treated in the strictest confidence and will only be used by the Admissions Committee.

    Required documents

    All the documents required are specified in the online application form and have to be attached to your online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

    The documents you have to provide with your application are:

    • An application letter in English (no longer than two pages)
    • Your curriculum vitae in English
    • Proof of competence in English
    • A copy of your passeport
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only candidates who need a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Please do not send original documents, as all submitted materials become the property of the Geneva Academy upon receipt. Documents cannot be returned to the applicant nor forwarded to other schools or agencies.


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    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Country: Switzerland
    Registration deadline: 03 Jan 2019
    Starting date: 10 Jan 2019
    Ending date: 24 Jan 2019

    This short course will provide participants with a comprehensive introduction to both substantive human rights law as well as the functioning of international mechanisms for the protection of human rights.

    It will start with an introduction to the nature and sources of international human rights law and its place in the international legal system. Afterwards, the course will examine the different institutional mechanisms for the protection of human rights, both at the universal and regional levels, before delving into an analysis of substantive rights. At the end of the course, participants will be in a position to further delve into human rights literature and case law in order to enhance their grasp of the law, as well as understand the major debates and controversies in the field of human rights protection.

    Audience

    This short course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Classes take place on:

    • Thursday 10 January 2019 18:00 – 20:30
    • Friday 11 January 2019, 15:30 – 18:00
    • Thursday 17 January 2019, 18:00 – 20:30
    • Friday 18 January 2019, 15:30 – 18:00
    • Thursday 24 January 2019 18:00 – 20:30

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Country: Switzerland
    Registration deadline: 18 Mar 2019
    Starting date: 02 Apr 2019
    Ending date: 04 Apr 2019

    Truth Commissions are by now an integral part of the transitional justice vocabulary and practice.

    In countries as varied as Peru, South Africa, Timor-Leste, Tunisia, Kenya and Brazil, truth commissions have been set up to investigate the patterns of past human rights violations.

    The 2019 Spring School will provide a comprehensive, multidimensional and practical examination of this transitional justice mechanism, shedding light on both its aims and the practical challenges it has met or is likely to meet.

    In engaging with these issues, the Spring School will address practically relevant questions about why to set up a truth commission and what role such an institution may play in addressing serious individually and collectively suffered wrongdoing. At the same time, the Spring School will directly engage with relevant questions about how to set up a truth commission, when and by whom.

    Structure and Methodology

    With the aim of linking theory with practical perspectives, the 2019 Spring School will combine interactive lectures on truth commissions and the relevant normative frameworks with practical exercises which will allow students to reflect on the aims and processes of truth commissions via an active and sustainable learning experience.

    On the basis of a hypothetical case scenario, students will have to design and formulate the mandate of a ‘moot’ truth commission. Based on group work and with expert support, they will simulate roles in the advisory and drafting processes leading to the establishment of a truth commission.

    Howard Varney, a leading expert on truth commissions and Senior Programme Advisor at the International Centre for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) will be present throughout the entire Spring School, delivering the courses, sharing his field experience, guiding discussions and managing the practical exercise. He will be supported by a team of the Master of Advanced Study in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law (MTJ).

    Objectives

    At the end of the Spring School, students will have gained insight into:

    • The role of truth-seeking in transitional justice processes
    • Normative frameworks and practices relevant to truth commissions
    • Practical challenges faced in the process of establishing truth commissions
    • The contribution of different actors and perspectives in shaping the mandate of a truth commission
    • The importance of creatively adapting theoretical concepts to particular societal contexts
    • The challenges in drafting detailed terms of reference to provide appropriate guidance for the work of a truth commission
    • Group-based processes of argumentation and negotiation leading to some common position on particular aspects relevant to the work of truth commission.

    Audience

    The Transitional Justice Spring School forms part of the MTJ. It is open to external participants – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, UN staff and staff from other international organizations, and academics and students interested in the topic – who are not enrolled in the MTJ and who want to deepen their expertise in functions setting-up, practice and challenges of truth commissions.

    Certification

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the Spring School (no ECTS credits).

    Accommodation

    Participants may request on-campus accommodation when applying. Due to the limited places available, accommodation is not guaranteed. Participants seeking on-campus accommodation are encouraged to request this as soon as possible.


    How to register:

    Applications for the Transitional Justice Spring School must be submitted via this online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area).

    Once admitted to the spring school, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the spring school.


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    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Country: Switzerland
    Registration deadline: 09 Jun 2019
    Starting date: 09 Sep 2019
    Ending date: 13 Sep 2019

    How complementary are economic, social and cultural rights (ESCR) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the United Nations (UN) in 2015? Which mechanisms exist to monitor their implementation? What is the role of UN human rights mechanisms in monitoring ESCR and the SDGs? Which lessons can be learned from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) period?

    This training course explores the relationship between ESCR and SDGs and provides participants with practical tools to include ESCR and the SDGs in their work. Themes covered include the rights to health, food, water, sanitation, housing, education, work, and social security, and the SDGs related to these rights.

    Participants will observe a session of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and have the opportunity to engage with international human rights experts.

    Programme

    The course covers the following issues:

    • Human rights-based approaches to development
    • ESCR and the MDGs: lessons learned for the SDGs
    • The inclusion of human rights in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
    • Focus on specific SDGs and ESCR: the rights to health, education, water and sanitation, food, housing, work, and social security
    • SDGs 1 to 17: towards the full realization of ESCR for all?
    • No one will be left behind: the end of inequality and discrimination?
    • Gender, ESCR and SDGs
    • Collection of disaggregated data and indicators
    • Accountability at the international level: the High-Level Policy Forum on Sustainable Development and beyond
    • National ownership of the implementation and monitoring of ESCR and the SDGs
    • The role of UN human rights mechanisms in monitoring ESCR and the SDGs (Human Rights Council, special procedures, and treaty bodies)
    • Visit the CRC, and discussion with key experts based in Geneva

    Objectives

    At the end of this course, participants will be:

    • Familiar with human rights-based approaches to development
    • Able to identify the main achievements and weaknesses of the MDGs from a human rights perspective
    • Familiar with the content of specific ESCR and related SDGs, in particular, the rights to health, education, water and sanitation, food, housing, work, and social security
    • Able to identify the main differences and similarities between ESCR and the SDGs
    • Aware of the challenges to the full realization of ESCR and the SDGs
    • Knowledgeable about data collection and indicators to monitor ESCR and the SDGs
    • Aware of the role played by UN human rights mechanisms in monitoring ESCR and the SDGs, in particular, the Human Rights Council, special procedures, and treaty bodies
    • Cognizant of the obstacles faced by international and national mechanisms responsible for monitoring ESCR and the SDGs
    • Able to integrate tools for implementing and monitoring ESCR and the SDGs in their work.

    Methodology

    The course is interactive and participants are encouraged to share their own experiences and perspectives on the issues. The training sessions include lectures and discussions with experts, as well as practical examples and case studies. Sessions are designed to enhance knowledge exchange with peers and facilitators.

    Audience

    This training course is designed for staff of NGOs, development and human rights institutions, UN bodies and other international organizations, as well as representatives of governments and members of academia.

    Certification

    Participants who successfully complete the training course receive a certificate of participation from the Geneva Academy.

    Accommodation

    Participants may request an on-campus accommodation when applying. Due to the limited places available, accommodation is not guaranteed. Participants seeking on-campus accommodation are encouraged to request this as soon as possible.


    How to register:

    Applications must be submitted via the online application form.

    If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us: escrtraining[at]geneva-academy.ch


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