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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 25 Sep 2017
    Starting date: 01 Oct 2017
    Ending date: 30 Jun 2018

    Based in Geneva, this executive programme runs for nine months (October–June) and admits 15 to 20 practitioners annually. Six to nine additional months are needed to complete a master’s thesis and defend it before a jury.

    Courses take place on Thursday evenings and Friday afternoons at our headquarters, Villa Moynier. They cover the law of armed conflict, international human rights law and international criminal law. They also address current issues and challenges, including the repression of terrorism, peacekeeping and international refugee law.

    Taught by Geneva-based law professors and world-renowned law experts and professors, the programme enables participants to gain specialized knowledge directly applicable to professional work. It also responds to the growing need for specialists to address complex situations – in Afghanistan, Colombia, Iraq, Syria and elsewhere – and challenging processes such as criminal proceedings, international negotiations and humanitarian interventions.

    Diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations share expertise, discuss pressing concerns and reflect on the application of international law to their work.


    How to register:

    Candidates must have:

    • Work experience in a relevant field
    • A bachelor's degree
    • Proficiency in English: candidates whose mother tongue is not English must provide a certificate to prove their knowledge of English or a statement highlighting their solid background in English
    • A valid visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Three Steps

    The online application is divided into the following three steps:

    1. Complete the application form
    2. Attach the required documents
    3. Submit your application

    If you do not complete your application form in one go, a cookie will allow you to retrieve all the information you have provided if (1) you work from the same computer; (2) you haven’t refused the use of cookies when accessing the Geneva Academy website for the first time; (3) you haven’t refused cookies by adjusting the settings of your web browser.

    The information you provide in the application form will be treated in the strictest confidence and will only be used by the Admissions Committee.

    Required documents

    All the documents required are specified in the online application form and have to be attached to your online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

    The documents you have to provide with your application are:

    • An application letter
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Copies of relevant degrees and diplomas
    • Proof of competence in English
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only candidates who need a visa to enter the Schengen area)

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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 27 Mar 2017
    Starting date: 03 Apr 2017
    Ending date: 07 Apr 2017

    Descriptive

    The challenge of dealing with the aftermath of violent conflict continues to trouble countries throughout the world. In response to that challenge, the ever-expanding field of transitional justice proposes a range of practical measures to potentially assist societies emerging from oppressive rule or armed conflict.

    So far, however, relatively little attention has been paid to the role of memory, history and culture in transitional processes. What roles can culture as ‘memory work’ play in contexts of transitional justice? Do cultural initiatives such as public memorials, theatre performances, film screenings and photo exhibitions ‘work’ as avenues for coming to terms with the past and preventing future atrocities? What is the role of education and history in processes of social transformation? Is there a duty to preserve memory, and what is the potential contribution of archives in this respect? What are some of the practical challenges faced by memorialization efforts around the world?

    The Transitional Justice Spring School 2017 aims to address these complex questions through an interdisciplinary, comprehensively structured high-quality one-week programme featuring leading experts.

    Audience

    The Transitional Justice Spring School forms part of the Geneva Academy Master of Advanced Studies in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law (MTJ). It is open to external participants – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, UN staff and staff from other international organizations, and academics and students interested in the topic – who are not enrolled in the MTJ and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the Spring School (no ECTS credits).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for the Spring School must be submitted via an online form.

    Your application will need to include:

    • An application letter, stating the specific course you are applying for and your motivation for participation
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Copies of relevant degrees and diplomas
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 30 Mar 2017
    Starting date: 06 Apr 2017
    Ending date: 04 May 2017

    Descriptive

    This course provides a concise and systematic treatment of the peacebuilding process in post-conflict and fragile situations. It adopts a holistic definition of peacebuilding that includes social, political and economic dimensions. It also focuses on the role of the different stakeholders involved and emphasizes the importance of ownership and inclusiveness as well as the need to tailor the process to the specific peculiarities of each situation. The course critically examines the role, achievements and failures of the UN Peacebuilding Commission established in 2005, taking into account the report of the UN Advisory Group of Experts delivered in 2015. It then considers all components of the peacebuilding process in a systematic manner, with a view to offering an innovative approach combining the socio-political issues with economic growth in a sustainable development perspective. The last session of the course is devoted to a case study.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    • Thursday 6 April, 18:00-20:30
    • Friday 7 April, 15:30-18:00
    • Thursday 20 April, 18:00-20:30
    • Friday 21 April, 18:15-20:45
    • Thursday 4 May, 18:00-20:30

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for individual courses must be submitted via the online form.

    Your application will need to include:

    • An application letter, stating the specific course you are applying for and your motivation for participation
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Copies of relevant degrees and diplomas
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 14 Apr 2017
    Starting date: 21 Apr 2017
    Ending date: 19 May 2017

    Descriptive

    What is the impact of the International Criminal Court (International Criminal Court) on the fight against impunity? What is the role of its Prosecutor? What is the International Criminal Court’s case law regarding genocide and crimes against humanity? How does it deal with amnesties and truth commissions? This course examines the role and activities of the International Criminal Court. It addresses questions related to its jurisdiction, structures and procedural regime and provides an introduction to the major debates about interpretation of the International Criminal Court Statute.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    • Friday 21 April, 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 28 April, 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 5 May, 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 12 May, 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 19 May, 15:30-18:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for individual courses must be submitted via the online form.

    Your application will need to include:

    • An application letter, stating the specific course you are applying for and your motivation for participation
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Copies of relevant degrees and diplomas
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 20 Apr 2017
    Starting date: 27 Apr 2017
    Ending date: 01 Jun 2017

    Descriptive

    This course aims to study, in depth, an emblematic example of the complexity of international humanitarian law (International Humanitarian Law) and the challenges it raises: the classification of armed conflicts ( Armed Conflicts ). The course first analyzes the contours of the various categories of Armed Conflicts (e.g. international Armed Conflict, internationalized non-international Armed Conflicts, wars of national liberation, belligerent occupations, high-intensity and low-intensity non-international Armed Conflicts ) in connection with the traditional distinction between non-international and international Armed Conflicts . The course then questions the relevance of this last distinction in light of the requirements of contemporary Armed Conflicts and the increased role played by independent actors within them. The course relies, as much as possible, on concrete examples illustrating the different categories of Armed Conflicts and the controversies they raise.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    • Thursday 27 April, 18:00-20:30
    • Thursday 11 May, 18:00-20:30
    • Thursday 18 May, 18:00-20:30
    • Thursday 25 May, 18:00-20:30
    • Thursday 1 June, 18:00-20:30

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for individual courses must be submitted via the online form.

    Your application will need to include:

    • An application letter, stating the specific course you are applying for and your motivation for participation
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Copies of relevant degrees and diplomas
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 17 Feb 2017
    Starting date: 21 Feb 2017
    Ending date: 16 May 2017

    Descriptive

    What is the distinctive gender dimension of mass violence and large-scale human rights violations? How can it be integrated into transitional justice norms and practices? What are the recent legal and policy developments in this area, particularly at the level of the United Nations (UN)?

    This course sheds light on the history and concept of gender studies and their impact on current transitional justice debates. It focuses especially on developments at the UN level.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Master of Advanced Studies in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law (MTJ). It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the MTJ and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    • Tuesday 21 February, 16:00 - 18:00
    • Wednesday 15 March, 16:00 - 18:00
    • Wednesday 29 March, 16:00 - 18:00
    • Wednesday 12 April, 16:00 - 18:00
    • Wednesday 26 April, 16:00 - 18:00
    • Wednesday 3 May, 16:00 - 18:00
    • Tuesday 16 May, 16:00 - 18:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    ow to Apply

    Applications for individual courses must be submitted via the online form.

    Your application will need to include:

    • An application letter, stating the specific course you are applying for and your motivation for participation
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Copies of relevant degrees and diplomas
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 27 Mar 2017
    Starting date: 30 Mar 2017
    Ending date: 05 May 2017

    Descriptive

    What is the meaning of the ‘rule of law’ in the international arena? How can it be rebuilt in the aftermath of armed conflict or authoritarianism? What forms of institutional reform are required to restore the rule of law, and what measures can prevent the recurrence of lawless and arbitrary rule? How can previously abusive institutions, such as the police and the military, be reformed? What actions should be taken with respect to perpetrators? This introductory course explores the international dimension of the rule of law and its promotion in transitional contexts, focusing on institutional reform and guarantees of non-recurrence. The course also looks at the role of the international community and civil society in rule-of-law reform.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Master of Advanced Studies in Transitional Justice, Human Rights and the Rule of Law (MTJ). It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the MTJ and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    • Thursday 30 March, 10:15-12:00
    • Thursday 30 March, 14:15-16:00
    • Friday 31 March, 10:15-13:00
    • Wednesday 3 May, 10:15-12:00
    • Thursday 4 May 2017, 10:15-12:00
    • Friday 5 May 2017, 10:15-14:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for individual courses must be submitted via the online form.

    Your application will need to include:

    • An application letter, stating the specific course you are applying for and your motivation for participation
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Copies of relevant degrees and diplomas
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 03 Jun 2017
    Starting date: 03 Jul 2017
    Ending date: 07 Jul 2017

    How complementary are economic, social and cultural rights (ESCR) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the United Nations (UN) in 2015? Which mechanisms exist to monitor their implementation? What is the role of UN human rights mechanisms in monitoring ESCR and the SDGs? Which lessons can be learned from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) period?

    This training course explores the relationship between ESCR and SDGs, and provides participants with practical tools to include ESCR and the SDGs in their work. Themes covered include: the rights to health, food, water, sanitation, housing, education, work, and social security, and the SDGs related to these rights.

    Participants will observe a session of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the only human rights body explicitly referenced in the SDGs. Participants will also have the opportunity to engage with international human rights experts.

    Programme

    The course covers the following issues:

    • Human rights-based approaches to development
    • ESCR and the MDGs: lessons learned for the SDGs
    • The inclusion of human rights in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
    • Focus on specific SDGs and ESCR: the rights to health, education, water and sanitation, food, housing, work, and social security
    • SDGs 1 to 11: towards the full realization of ESCR for all?
    • No one will be left behind: the end of inequality and discrimination?
    • Gender, ESCR and SDGs
    • Collection of disaggregated data and indicators
    • Accountability at the international level: the High-Level Policy Forum on Sustainable Development and beyond
    • National ownership of the implementation and monitoring of ESCR and the SDGs
    • The role of UN human rights mechanisms in monitoring ESCR and the SDGs (Human Rights Council, special procedures, and treaty bodies)
    • Visit to the CEDAW, and discussion with key experts based in Geneva

    Objectives

    At the end of this course, participants will be:

    • Familiar with human rights-based approaches to development
    • Able to identify the main achievements and weaknesses of the MDGs from a human rights perspective
    • Familiar with the content of specific ESCR and related SDGs, in particular the rights to health, education, water and sanitation, food, housing, work, and social security
    • Able to identify the main differences and similarities between ESCR and the SDGs
    • Aware of the challenges to the full realization of ESCR and the SDGs
    • Knowledgeable about data collection and indicators to monitor ESCR and the SDGs
    • Aware of the role played by UN human rights mechanisms in monitoring ESCR and the SDGs, in particular the Human Rights Council, special procedures, and treaty bodies
    • Cognizant of the obstacles faced by international and national mechanisms responsible for monitoring ESCR and the SDGs
      Able to integrate tools for implementing and monitoring ESCR and the SDGs in their work

    Methodology

    The course is interactive and participants are encouraged to share their own experiences and perspectives on the issues. The training sessions include lectures and discussions with experts, as well as practical examples and case studies. Sessions are designed to enhance knowledge exchange with peers and facilitators.

    Audience

    This training course is designed for staff of NGOs, development and human rights institutions, UN bodies and other international organizations, as well as representatives of governments and members of academia.

    Certification

    Participants who successfully complete the training course receive a certificate of participation from the Geneva Academy.

    Fee

    The training fee for this five-day programme is 1,530 Swiss Francs (30 percent discount for PhD and master students).

    The fee includes tuition costs, course materials, 5 lunches, and refreshments during coffee breaks.

    It is payable as soon as your place has been confirmed, and at the latest 3 weeks before the start of the course (12 June 2017).

    All participants are responsible for their own travel costs to Geneva, including Swiss visa fees and evening meals (approximately 30 Swiss Francs per meal).

    Accommodation

    Participants may request on-campus accommodation via the online application form. Due to the limited places available, accommodation is not guaranteed. Participants seeking on-campus accommodation are encouraged to request this as soon as possible.


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications must be submitted via the online application form.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 02 Sep 2017
    Starting date: 02 Oct 2017
    Ending date: 05 Oct 2017

    What is the human rights impact of land grabbing? How have United Nations (UN) human rights mechanisms responded to the phenomenon? What forms of protection are currently being provided under international law in relation to the right to land, as well as for land rights defenders? What mechanisms are available to monitor and remedy human rights violations associated with land grabbing at the national or regional levels?

    This training course provides participants with an in-depth examination of the complex relationship between human rights and land grabbing. The course focuses on the impact of land grabbing on the rights to food, water, housing, and work, and on the protection of land rights defenders, who are among those most at risk of being arbitrarily arrested or killed.

    Participants will be provided with information on the ongoing negotiation process to elaborate a UN declaration on the rights of peasants and other people working in rural areas, which contains provisions on the right to land.

    They will have opportunities to meet with experts based in Geneva, notably during the expert seminar on the rights of peasants which will be held at the UN on the day after the training course.

    Programme

    The training course covers the following issues:

    • The normative content of human rights affected by land grabbing, in particular economic, social and cultural rights, and the obligations of States related to these rights
    • Human rights impact of land grabbing
    • Human rights responses to land grabbing
    • The protection of human rights defenders in the context of land grabbing
    • Role of UN mechanisms in monitoring human rights violations associated with land grabbing (Human Rights Council, special procedures and treaty bodies)
    • Access to justice at the national and regional levels
    • History and current status of the negotiation process for the drafting of a UN Declaration on the rights of peasants and other people working in rural areas
    • The recognition of the right to land in the draft UN Declaration on the rights of peasants and other people working in rural areas
    • Discussions with experts, civil society representatives, and diplomats negotiating the draft UN Declaration.

    Objectives

    At the end of this course, participants will be:

    • Familiar with the content of human rights affected by land grabbing, in particular economic, social and cultural rights, and States’ obligations related to these rights
    • Able to identify and effectively describe human rights violations associated with land grabbing
    • Knowledgeable about human rights responses to land grabbing, as well as the protection of human rights defenders under international law
    • Knowledgeable about the role played by UN mechanisms in monitoring human rights violations associated with land grabbing (Human Rights Council, special procedures and treaty bodies)
    • Familiar with the negotiation taking place at the Human Rights Council to elaborate a UN Declaration on the rights of peasants and other people working in rural areas
    • Knowledgeable about the content of the draft UN Declaration
    • Able to discuss challenges in the recognition of the right to land in the UN Declaration.

    Expert Seminar

    Participants are invited to attend the expert seminar on the rights of peasants, which will be held at the UN on Friday 6 October 2017, 9:00-17:30 (free of charge).

    Certification

    Participants who successfully complete the training course receive a certificate of participation from the Geneva Academy.

    Fee

    The training fee for this four-day programme is 1,230 Swiss Francs (30 percent discount for PhD and master students).

    The fee includes tuition costs, course materials, 4 lunches, and refreshments during coffee breaks.

    The fee is payable as soon as your place has been confirmed, and at the latest 3 weeks before the start of the course (11 September 2017).

    All participants are responsible for their own travel costs to Geneva, including Swiss visa fees and evening meals (approximately 30 Swiss Francs per meal).

    Accommodation

    Participants can request on-campus accommodation via the online application form. Due to the limited places available, accommodation is not guaranteed. Participants seeking on-campus accommodation are encouraged to request it as soon as possible.


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications must be submitted via the online application form.


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    Country: World
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights, Synergies Coopération
    Registration deadline: 01 Oct 2017
    Starting date: 16 Oct 2017
    Ending date: 03 Dec 2017

    Sur la formation

    Cette formation permet d’acquérir une connaissance approfondie des droits économiques, sociaux et culturels (DESC), des obligations des Etats et des mécanismes chargés de les protéger et de surveiller leur mise en œuvre au niveau national.

    Cette formation est réalisée en partenariat avec la Geneva Academy et l'ONG Human Dignity

    Les objectifs de la formation

    A la fin de la formation, les participants seront capables de répondre aux questions suivantes :

    • Que sont les DESC, droits économiques, sociaux et culturels ?
    • Quels sont les textes de référence sur les DESC ?
    • Comment le droit à l'alimentation peut-il être mieux protégé, y compris pour les femmes ?
    • Quelles sont les obligations des Etats en matière de DESC ?
    • Quels sont les mécanismes de protection existant au niveau régional et au niveau international?
    • Comment reconnaître une violation des DESC ?
    • Qu’est-ce que la justiciabilité des DESC ?
    • Quelle est la complémentarité entre les DESC et les objectifs du développement durable (ODD) adoptés par l'ONU en 2015 ?

    Les modules de la formation

    Voici la liste des différents modules que nous allons étudier au cours de la formation:

    • Semaine 1: Les droits économiques sociaux et culturels : définition et contenu normatif

    Ce module présentera le contenu normatif des droits économiques, sociaux et culturels (DESC) inscrits au Pacte international relatif des droits économiques, sociaux et culturels (PIDESC). Seront également examinés les instruments régionaux et internationaux relatifs au DESC. Les principes généraux des droits humains seront également abordés : non-discrimination, participation et inclusion, transparence notamment.

    • Semaine 2: Les obligations des Etats

    Ce module abordera la nature des obligations des Etats en matière de DESC: obligations de respecter, protéger et mettre en œuvre les DESC. Seront également examinées la notion de réalisation progressive des droits économiques, sociaux et culturels ; les obligations immédiates et les obligations fondamentales minimum.
    Le cadre d’analyse de la mise en œuvre des DESC (Disponibilité, Accessibilité, Acceptabilité, Adaptabilité) sera présenté et illustré avec des exemples concrets.

    • Semaine 3: Le droit à l’alimentation

    Ce module discutera de la protection du droit à l'alimentation et du rôle des mécanismes de contrôle aux niveaux international et régional.

    Des exemples concrets seront donnés pour illustrer comment le droit à l'alimentation peut être mis en œuvre juridiquement, comme en Inde, et politiquement, comme au Brésil. L'accent sera mis sur le besoin de mieux protéger le droit à l'alimentation des femmes, en particulier dans les zones rurales.

    • Semaine 4: Les mécanismes régionaux et internationaux de protection des DESC

    Seront abordés les différents mécanismes de protection des DESC et leur rôle, en particulier, le Comité des DESC des Nations unies, la Commission africaine des droits de l’Homme et des Peuples. Le rôle du Conseil des droits de l’Homme des Nations unies et de ses procédures spéciales (Experts indépendants) sera également présenté.

    • Semaine 5: Identifier les violations des DESC

    Seront abordés lors de ce module différents exemples de violations afin de familiariser les participants à leur identification et leur documentation.

    • Semaine 6: Les recours contre les violations des DESC

    Ce module abordera la question de la justiciabilité des DESC en présentant les voies de recours en cas de violation d’un DESC au niveau national avec des exemples concrets de décisions de tribunaux.
    Les voies de recours au niveau régional et international seront également présentées y compris les premières décisions du Comité des DESC sur la base du Protocole facultatif se rapportant au PIDESC.

    • Semaine 7 : Les DESC et les objectifs du développement durable

    Ce module abordera la question de la complémentarité entre les DESC et les ODD adoptés par l'ONU en 2015.

    Les similitudes entre les objectifs des DESC et des ODD seront discutées. Une analyse critique du rôle des mécanismes de contrôle prévus par les ODD sera ensuite faite, avec une présentation du rôle des mécanismes de protection des droits de l'homme de l'ONU dans la surveillance de la mise en œuvre des ODD.

    Public cible

    Personnel d’ONG, de l’ONU et d’autres organisations internationales et intergouvernementales, représentants d’institutions nationales des droits de l'Homme, des autorités nationales et locales, avocats, juristes, consultants.

    Informations pratiques

    Durée de la formation : 7 semaines - 16 octobre - 3 décembre 2017

    Temps estimé de travail personnel par semaine: 4 à 6 heures


    How to register:

    Inscriptions directement sur le site internet http://formationsDH.org/inscriptions/

    Plus d'informations: http://www.formationsDH.org

    Vous pouvez également tester vos connaissances sur la thématique (quiz)


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 01 Oct 2017
    Starting date: 16 Oct 2017
    Ending date: 20 Oct 2017

    Cette formation en ligne de sept semaines permet d’acquérir une connaissance approfondie des droits économiques, sociaux et culturels (DESC), des obligations des états et des mécanismes chargés de les protéger et de surveiller leur mise en œuvre. Elle est organisée par l’Académie de droit international humanitaire et de droits humains à Genève, Synergies Coopération et Human Dignity.

    Objectifs

    A la fin de la formation, les participants pourront répondre aux questions suivantes:

    • Que sont les DESC?
    • Quels sont les textes de référence sur les DESC ?
    • Comment le droit à l’alimentation peut-il être mieux protégé, y compris pour les femmes?
    • Quelles sont les obligations des états en matière de DESC ?
    • Quels sont les mécanismes de protection existant aux niveaux régional et international ?
    • Comment reconnaître une violation des DESC ?
    • Qu’est-ce que la justiciabilité des DESC ?
    • Quelle est la complémentarité entre les DESC et les Objectifs du Développement Durable adoptés par l’ONU en 2015 ?

    Public Cible

    Cette formation en ligne s’adresse au personnel d’ONG, de l’ONU et d’autres organisations internationales et intergouvernementales, aux représentants d’institutions nationales des droits de l’Homme, aux autorités nationales et locales, avocats, juristes et consultants.

    Il n’est pas nécessaire d’avoir des connaissances préalables sur les DESC pour suivre cette formation.

    Modules

    La formation comprend un module par semaine durant sept semaines. Chaque semaine, vous aurez ainsi accès à un nouveau module qui comprend:

    • Une vidéo de présentation du thème de la semaine (30 minutes maximum)
    • Des documents à lire pour approfondir le thème
    • Un quiz à faire en ligne pour tester vos connaissances sur ce thème (les quiz seront notés et vous permettront de recevoir un certificat en fin de formation si votre moyenne est supérieure à 10/20).
    • Une réunion Skype d’une heure sera également organisée avec le formateur et les autres participants.

    Module 1 (Semaine 1) – Les DESC : Définition et Contenu Normatif

    Ce module présente le contenu normatif des DESC inscrits au Pacte international relatif des droits économiques, sociaux et culturels (PIDESC). Il examine également les instruments régionaux et internationaux relatifs aux DESC, ainsi que les principes généraux des droits humains dont la non-discrimination, la participation et l’inclusion, et la transparence.

    Module 2 (Semaine 2) – Les Obligations des Etats

    Ce module aborde la nature des obligations des états en matière de DESC: obligations de respecter, protéger et mettre en œuvre. Il examine également la notion de réalisation progressive des DESC, les obligations immédiates et les obligations fondamentales minimum. Le cadre d’analyse de la mise en œuvre des DESC (disponibilité, accessibilité, acceptabilité, adaptabilité) est abordé et illustré avec des exemples concrets.

    Module 3 (Semaine 3) – Le Droit à l’Alimentation

    Ce module discute de la protection du droit à l'alimentation et du rôle des mécanismes de contrôle aux niveaux international et régional. Des exemples concrets illustrent comment le droit à l'alimentation peut être mis en œuvre juridiquement, comme en Inde, et politiquement, comme au Brésil. L'accent est mis sur le besoin de mieux protéger le droit à l'alimentation des femmes, en particulier dans les zones rurales.

    Module 4 (Semaine 4) – Les Mécanismes Régionaux et Internationaux de Protection des DESC

    Ce module aborde les différents mécanismes de protection des DESC et leur rôle, en particulier, le Comité des DESC de l’ONU et la Commission Africaine des Droits de l’Homme et des Peuples. Le rôle du Conseil des droits de l’homme et de ses procédures spéciales est également présenté.

    Module 5 (Semaine 5) – Identifier les violations des DESC

    Ce module permet de familiariser les participants à l’identification et à la documentation des violations DESC à travers différents exemples de violations.

    Module 6 (Semaine 6) – Les recours contre les Violations des DESC

    Ce module aborde la question de la justiciabilité des DESC en présentant les voies de recours en cas de violation d’un DESC au niveau national avec des exemples concrets de décisions de tribunaux. Les voies de recours aux niveaux régional et international seront également présentées, y compris les premières décisions du Comité des DESC de l’ONU sur la base du Protocole facultatif au PIDESC.

    Module 7 (Semaine 7) Les DESC et les Objectifs du Développement Durable

    Ce module aborde la question de la complémentarité entre les DESC et les Objectifs du Développement Durable (ODD) adoptés par l'ONU en 2015. Les similitudes entre les objectifs des DESC et des ODD seront discutées. Une analyse critique du rôle des mécanismes de contrôle prévus par les ODD sera ensuite faite, avec une présentation du rôle des mécanismes de protection des droits de l'homme de l'ONU dans la surveillance de la mise en œuvre des ODD.


    How to register:

    Inscriptions

    Les inscriptions se font exclusivement par le biais du site internet de notre partenaire Synergies Coopération jusqu’au 1er octobre 2017.

    Votre inscription ne sera confirmée qu’à réception de votre règlement. Dans les 15 jours de la réception des fonds, vous recevrez un message de bienvenue vous indiquant la marche à suivre pour la formation.


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    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 23 Jan 2018
    Starting date: 24 Jan 2018
    Ending date: 02 Feb 2018

    Skills for Personal Effectiveness

    Preparing for intense and high-level engagement during the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC) requires a deep understanding of HRC rules, functioning and practice. The ability to negotiate, advocate, lobby and push for issues in such a complex environment also requires a sound knowledge of the different actors and dynamics at play, as well as strong communication skills.

    This short course, ahead of the main HRC session, allows participants to develop their network and acquire the necessary skills to lead and perform effectively in this major forum for human rights diplomacy.

    Programme

    The course is structured around three main themes:

    The Functioning of the HRC

    • The functioning, rules and practice of HRC
    • The various HRC mechanisms (e.g. special sessions, commissions of inquiry, special procedures, universal periodical review)
    • The dynamics at play
    • The role and influence of individuals
    • The role, functions and influence of other actors: who does what? How does this play out in concrete terms?
    • The role of ‘satellite’ factors, such as unexpected political situations or external pressures

    The phenomenon of working within and across ‘groupings’

    • HRC regional groups and their dynamics
    • Coalitions
    • Serving in one or more groupings
    • Tensions between bilateral/multilateral policies and HRC diplomacy, and the challenges of ensuring cohesion between these
    • Best practices and tools for juggling a complex agenda

    Leadership in the HRC

    • Leading through a negotiation and lobbying techniques
    • Chairing formal and informal multilateral meetings
    • Navigating unexpected and spontaneous opportunities
    • Optional pre-session reading materials are made available two weeks prior to the training, for background, context and introduction of key concepts

    Benefits

    This course allows participants to acquire:

    • A deeper understanding of the functioning, rules and practice of the HRC
    • Key leadership skills in human rights negotiations, advocacy and lobbying
    • First-hand insights into HRC dynamics, in an informal and non-partisan environment
    • Strong knowledge of the various actors intervening in the HRC and its different mechanisms (e.g. special sessions, commissions of inquiry, special procedures, universal periodical review)

    Lecturers

    Lecturers include Geneva Academy experts, renowned academic scholars, as well as senior professionals from international organizations, NGOs and governments.

    Methodology

    The course is composed of interactive lessons, using case studies of real situations in the HRC from the last three sessions. These help participants to acquire the required knowledge, take part in discussion forums and engage with practical examples and case studies. The various sessions are designed to address cross-cutting issues and build participant skills through simulation exercises, small group breakouts and role-playing.

    Throughout the course, participants interact with their peers, key HRC actors, as well as academics and experienced practitioners.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is designed for professionals who already have some experience with the HRC: diplomats and experts from diplomatic missions and foreign ministries; staff from international and regional organizations working in the field of human rights; employees of governmental and non-governmental organizations, journalists or representatives of National Human Rights Institutions.

    Schedule

    • Wednesday 24 January 2018, 15:30-19:15
    • Thursday 25 January 2018, 15:30-17:30
    • Friday 26 January 2018, 13:15-15:15
    • Thursday 1 February 2018, 15:30-20:00
    • Friday 2 February 2018, 13:15-15:15

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for short courses must be submitted via the online form.

    If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • An application letter, stating the specific course you are applying for and your motivation for participation
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 23 Jan 2018
    Starting date: 24 Jan 2018
    Ending date: 02 Feb 2018

    Skills for Personal Effectiveness

    Preparing for intense and high-level engagement during the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC) requires a deep understanding of HRC rules, functioning and practice. The ability to negotiate, advocate, lobby and push for issues in such a complex environment also requires a sound knowledge of the different actors and dynamics at play, as well as strong communication skills.

    This short course, ahead of the main HRC session, allows participants to develop their network and acquire the necessary skills to lead and perform effectively in this major forum for human rights diplomacy.

    Programme

    The course is structured around three main themes:

    The Functioning of the HRC

    • The functioning, rules and practice of HRC
    • The various HRC mechanisms (e.g. special sessions, commissions of inquiry, special procedures, universal periodical review)
    • The dynamics at play
    • The role and influence of individuals
    • The role, functions and influence of other actors: who does what? How does this play out in concrete terms?
    • The role of ‘satellite’ factors, such as unexpected political situations or external pressures

    The phenomenon of working within and across ‘groupings’

    • HRC regional groups and their dynamics
    • Coalitions
    • Serving in one or more groupings
    • Tensions between bilateral/multilateral policies and HRC diplomacy, and the challenges of ensuring cohesion between these
    • Best practices and tools for juggling a complex agenda

    Leadership in the HRC

    • Leading through a negotiation and lobbying techniques
    • Chairing formal and informal multilateral meetings
    • Navigating unexpected and spontaneous opportunities
    • Optional pre-session reading materials are made available two weeks prior to the training, for background, context and introduction of key concepts

    Benefits

    This course allows participants to acquire:

    • A deeper understanding of the functioning, rules and practice of the HRC
    • Key leadership skills in human rights negotiations, advocacy and lobbying
    • First-hand insights into HRC dynamics, in an informal and non-partisan environment
    • Strong knowledge of the various actors intervening in the HRC and its different mechanisms (e.g. special sessions, commissions of inquiry, special procedures, universal periodical review)

    Lecturers

    Lecturers include Geneva Academy experts, renowned academic scholars, as well as senior professionals from international organizations, NGOs and governments.

    Methodology

    The course is composed of interactive lessons, using case studies of real situations in the HRC from the last three sessions. These help participants to acquire the required knowledge, take part in discussion forums and engage with practical examples and case studies. The various sessions are designed to address cross-cutting issues and build participant skills through simulation exercises, small group breakouts and role-playing.

    Throughout the course, participants interact with their peers, key HRC actors, as well as academics and experienced practitioners.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is designed for professionals who already have some experience with the HRC: diplomats and experts from diplomatic missions and foreign ministries; staff from international and regional organizations working in the field of human rights; employees of governmental and non-governmental organizations, journalists or representatives of National Human Rights Institutions.

    Schedule

    • Wednesday 24 January 2018, 15:30-19:15
    • Thursday 25 January 2018, 15:30-17:30
    • Friday 26 January 2018, 13:15-15:15
    • Thursday 1 February 2018, 15:30-20:00
    • Friday 2 February 2018, 13:15-15:15

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for short courses must be submitted via the online form.

    If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • An application letter, stating the specific course you are applying for and your motivation for participation
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 04 Jan 2018
    Starting date: 11 Jan 2018
    Ending date: 08 Feb 2018

    Descriptive

    This course aims to study, in depth, an emblematic example of the complexity of international humanitarian law (IHL) and the challenges it raises: the classification of armed conflicts (ACs). The course first analyzes the contours of the various categories of ACs (e.g. international AC, internationalized non-international ACs, wars of national liberation, belligerent occupations, high-intensity and low-intensity non-international ACs) in connection with the traditional distinction between non-international and international ACs. The course then questions the relevance of this last distinction in light of the requirements of contemporary ACs and the increased role played by independent actors within them. The course relies, as much as possible, on concrete examples illustrating the different categories of ACs and the controversies they raise.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Thursday 11 January 18:00-20:30
    • Thursday 18 January 18:00-20:30
    • Thursday 25 January 18:00-20:30
    • Thursday 1st February 2018 18:00-20:30
    • Thursday 8 February 2018 18:00-20:30

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 09 Feb 2018
    Starting date: 16 Feb 2018
    Ending date: 16 Mar 2018

    Descriptive

    Who is a refugee? What is the legal framework currently applicable to those fleeing states affected by armed conflicts like Syria, Iraq or Afghanistan? What are the related obligations of European states? This course analyses the main international and regional legal norms governing refugee protection. It examines the sources of international refugee law, including the 1951 Geneva Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, and their interaction with human rights law and international humanitarian law. It also analyzes the definition of a refugee under both the 1951 Geneva Convention and the Common European Asylum System, the principle of non-refoulement as well as asylum procedures. Particular attention is dedicated to the case law of State Parties to the 1951 Geneva Convention.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Friday 16 February 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 23 February 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 2 March 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 9 March 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 16 March 15:30-18:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 09 Feb 2018
    Starting date: 16 Feb 2018
    Ending date: 16 Mar 2018

    Descriptive

    Since the 9.11 attacks, and with the multiplication of terrorist attacks on European soil, terrorism is considered one of the most important security threats the international community has to face. To what extent may states limit and/or derogate from their international human rights obligations in order to prevent and counter terrorism and thus protect persons under their jurisdiction? Which and whose human rights are at risk when states fight terrorism? What are the human rights challenges posed by the United Nations counter-terrorist sanctions regime? In which circumstances may lethal force – including drone strikes – be used against alleged members of terrorist groups or so-called ‘lone wolves’? Which international law rules apply in relation to the internment/detention and interrogation of persons accused of terrorism?

    These are some of the key issues discussed in this course, addressing several rights including the right to life, the right to liberty, the prohibition of torture, the right to property, and freedom of movement. Although the course is mainly human rights oriented, other international legal frameworks such as jus ad bellum and international humanitarian law will be touched upon. Recent trends in counter-terrorism, such as the preventing and countering violent extremism agenda, will be discussed in light of their human rights impact.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Friday 16 February 18:15-20:45
    • Friday 23 February 18:15-20:45
    • Friday 2 March 18:15-20:45
    • Friday 9 March 18:15-20:45
    • Friday 16 March 18:15-20:45

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 11 May 2018
    Starting date: 12 Apr 2018
    Ending date: 18 May 2018

    Descriptive

    The system of international criminal justice includes the International Criminal Court and several other institutions – international, domestic, regional and ‘hybrid’. These institutions mostly ‘speak’ through case law. The course focuses on exploring the major themes of this case law in areas such as jurisdiction, substantive crimes (war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, terrorism), criminal responsibility and major procedural milestones in criminal proceedings. It also addresses topics such as the nature and modalities of judicial deliberations and the assignment of judges to cases before courts and tribunals dealing with international crimes.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations –who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Thursday 12 April 18:00-20:30
    • Friday 13 April 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 20 April 15:30-18:00
    • Thursday 17 May 18:00-20:30
    • Friday 18 May 15:30-18:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 06 Apr 2018
    Starting date: 13 Apr 2018
    Ending date: 04 May 2018

    Descriptive

    This course provides a concise and systematic treatment of the peacebuilding process in post-conflict and fragile situations. It adopts a holistic definition of peacebuilding that combines the socio-political issues with economic growth in a sustainable development perspective. It also focuses on the roles and interests of the different stakeholders involved as well as on the concepts of ownership and inclusiveness. The course critically examines the achievements and failures of the UN Peacebuilding Commission established in 2005, taking into account the report of the UN Advisory Group of Experts delivered in 2015. The course finally considers the economic dimension of the process from the standpoint of governments, international organizations, donors and financial institutions.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Friday 13 April 18:15-20:45
    • Thursday 19 April 18:00-20:30
    • Friday 20 April 18:15-20:45
    • Friday 27 April 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 4 May 15:30-18:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 19 Apr 2018
    Starting date: 26 Apr 2018
    Ending date: 24 May 2018

    Descriptive

    This course examines one of the main purpose of international humanitarian law (IHL), which is to mitigate human suffering caused by war. It enables a careful evaluation of the various IHL rules intended to help protect vulnerable persons, such as civilians and prisoners of war, as well as property during armed conflict. It also examines the issue of non-international armed conflict (NIAC) from a variety of perspectives. Following this course, participants will know who and what protected persons and goods are and which IHL rules can be used for their protection in international armed conflicts and NIAC.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Thursday 26 April 18:00-20:30
    • Thursday 3 May 18:00-20:30
    • Thursday 10 May 18:00-20:30
    • Friday 11 May 15:30-18:00
    • Thursday 24 May 18:00-20:30

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).cipants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


    0 0

    Country: Switzerland
    Organization: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
    Registration deadline: 05 Jan 2018
    Starting date: 12 Jan 2018
    Ending date: 09 Feb 2018

    Descriptive

    What role do sanctions play in international law? What are the conditions for implementing sanctions against a state? Who decides? Are sanctions a useful tool for avoiding or stopping armed conflicts? This course provides an introduction to the regime of sanctions under international law and their effectiveness in addressing contemporary forms of conflict. It addresses the questions related to state responsibility, the pacific settlement of international disputes and the role of the International Court of Justice.

    Audience

    This course forms part of the Geneva Academy Executive Master in International Law in Armed Conflict. It is open to professionals – diplomats, lawyers, legal advisers, judges, NGO staff, human rights advocates, media specialists, professionals working in emergency situations, UN staff and staff from other international organizations – who are not enrolled in the Executive Master and who want to deepen their expertise in this specific issue.

    Schedule

    Courses take place on:

    • Friday 12 January 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 19 January 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 26 January 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 2 February 15:30-18:00
    • Friday 9 February 15:30-18:00

    Certificate

    Participants obtain a certificate at the end of the course (no ECTS credits are gained).


    How to register:

    How to Apply

    Applications for this short course must be submitted via the online form. If you encounter problems with your application, do not hesitate to contact us.

    Your application will need to include:

    • A short motivation letter (no more than one page)
    • Your curriculum vitae
    • Proof of your competence in English (a certificate or statement highlighting your solid background in English)
    • A valid copy of your visa or residence permit (only applicants who require a visa to enter the Schengen area)

    Once admitted to the course, participants receive instructions on how to pay. Proof of payment is required before you begin the course.


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